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Posts Tagged "Network Scaffold Services"

Who is Competent for Scaffold Inspections?

Who is Competent for Scaffold Inspections?

By on Apr 22, 2020 in Blog |

Scaffolding inspections are an integral part of ensuring the work being conducted is safe and adheres to industry standards. Here at Network Scaffold, we understand the importance of ensuring the safety of our team, other workers and the general public (depending on the location of the site). For our latest blog, we are going to talk about workers who can undertake scaffold inspections. The Importance of Qualified Scaffolding Inspectors Legislation states that anyone carrying out inspections must be competent, meaning the person must have the necessary training, knowledge and experience. As a minimum, they should have one of the following qualifications – 1. A Construction Industry Scaffolders Record Scheme (CISRS) cardholder, provided their employer demonstrates necessary knowledge and experience. 2. A CISRS Advanced Scaffolder cardholder, again provided their employer demonstrates sufficient knowledge and experience. 3. A CISRS Scaffolding Supervisor cardholder, plus if the person also holds the Advanced Scaffolders card they are deemed competent to inspect advanced structures. 4. A person who has taken the Basic Scaffold Inspection Course, and can demonstrate the necessary knowledge and experience from the course. 5. A person who has taken the Advanced Scaffold Inspection Course, and again shows sufficient knowledge and experience gained from the course. 6. Persons required to carry out inspections of System Scaffolds must have their card endorsed with the product selected plus attending the basic scaffold inspection course and attend an approved product training course for the specific system scaffold required. Speak to the Scaffold Specialists Today If you require scaffolding for your next project, look no further than Network Scaffold; the leading provider in Derby and the surrounding areas. Network Scaffold can also provide alloy towers, edge protection and access scaffolding for both domestic and commercial projects. If you have any more questions about scaffolding, please contact us or visit our FAQ page to see if answers are already provided on this...

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Guidance for Scaffold Inspections and Risk Assessments

Guidance for Scaffold Inspections and Risk Assessments

By on Apr 16, 2020 in Blog |

In the wake of the COVOD-19 pandemic, new guidelines have been released from the Scaffolding Association regarding risk assessments and site inspections. As an associated member of the Scaffolding Association, Network Scaffold are adhering to new measures put in place to maintain social distancing and keep our workforce and the general public safe. The Importance of Risk Assessments A risk assessment is a key element to determining the frequency of periodic inspections and identifying scaffolds that may be at most risk from adverse weather. Here are some points that should be considered for risk assessments on low risk and high-risk sites – Low-Risk Sites This type of site is usually self-contained with a low risk of the scaffold structure being compromised or components falling outside of the site boundary. Examples include – Site using scaffold that is less than 10 metres in height Sites with fencing or hoarding where the scaffold is not adjacent to the boundary A commercial site where the business operations have ceased High-Risk Sites This type of site will be situated in the public domain, or are self-contained with the scaffold structure at high risk of being compromised or components falling outside of the site boundary. Here are four examples to note – Sites with scaffold over 10 metres in height A site using sheeted scaffolds or temporary roofs Sites adjacent to highways, transport areas or utilities A commercial site where the business operations continue to function How to Undertake Scaffolding Inspections The Government is currently advising that people, except for essential workers, to stay at home because of the direct risk to life from COVOD-19. Where undertaking an inspection is necessary, guidelines should be considered and implemented. Before attending site for inspections, you will need to have the following in place – The correct contact details of the Client or Principal Contractor Arrangements for gaining safe access to the site Suitable lone working procedures for the Scaffold Inspector COVOD-19 risk assessment for the Scaffold Inspector COVOD-19 risk assessment for any individuals required to carry out necessary remedial works Want to Know More? Contact Us Today If you have any more questions about scaffolding services provided by Network Scaffold, please get in touch...

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Choosing Scaffold Towers Instead of a Ladder

Choosing Scaffold Towers Instead of a Ladder

By on Apr 7, 2020 in Blog |

Alloy towers hold many advantages over ladders for jobs that need completing around homes or in the garden. Network Scaffold is the leading supplier of scaffolding and scaffold towers across Derbyshire, which is why we have put together five reasons you should be choosing them every time. Five Reasons to Use Scaffold Towers 1. Safety – Scaffolding towers are much safer than ladders, as they have a wider surface area plus they are supported on four legs making them free-standing. Ladders, on the other hand, are on two legs and rest at an angle. Ensuring you have a flat platform to work on is much more stable and do not have to worry about falling off a ladder that could wobble and requires closer supervision and care when in use. Safety is the top priority for scaffold towers and is made clear from erecting the scaffold to dismantling it. 2. The Platform – The platform on alloy towers allows you to move around more freely and have your tools and equipment close by, plus you can leave it in place for longer. Eliminating the hassle of moving ladders, using a tower will prove a great time saver. The structures platform reduces the need for accompanying assistance, whereas with a ladder you will need someone at the base to make sure it is secure. Platforms are also equipped with bars or guide rails to prevent users from falling off, which enhances its safety. 3. Easy to Work On – Alloy towers make jobs such as painting and de-guttering quite straightforward, helping you gain access to difficult to reach areas. The ability to work more easily means that work will be completed faster. Ladders are useful for smaller tasks, but if you need a more robust and professional piece of equipment then scaffold towers are the best choice. 4. Straightforward to Manoeuvre – Scaffold towers are usually equipped with wheels, which allows users to change the location of the tower easily, compared to cumbersome ladders. Whilst moving a tower you should always reduce the height to no higher than 4 metres. Before moving the tower ensure the ground is stable and there are no risks to the tower or the user...

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Coronavirus Guidelines for Scaffolding Firms Explained

Coronavirus Guidelines for Scaffolding Firms Explained

By on Apr 3, 2020 in Blog |

The Coronavirus has had a significant impact on businesses, affecting operations, supply chains, customer engagement and service. Here at Network Scaffold, we understand the challenges this has created in the scaffolding sector, with regards to protecting workers and the general public. Recently the Scaffolding Association has released guidelines to help scaffolding firms handle this tricky situation, whilst continuing to provide a vital service to clients. For our latest blog, we are going to focus on the guidance for on-site workers plus the necessary PPE equipment that will be made available. Coronavirus – Working Onsite for Scaffolders The health and safety requirements must not be compromised and if the scaffolding task cannot be undertaken safely then it should not take place. According to the Scaffolding Association, the following measures should be considered when employees are undertaking necessary work onsite – Planning work to minimise contact with other site users, which could include altering shift patterns or restricting access to work areas. Complying with social distancing measures and keeping 2 metres apart. While working on scaffolding this would equate to being approximately one bay apart vertically or every other life horizontally. Using stairs in preference to lifts Use your own tools and equipment Canteens will not be operating as normal, with breaks staggered with employees bringing their own prepared meals and drinks whilst adhering to social distancing measures. Soap and water should be easily accessible and where not possible, hand sanitiser. Sufficient waste bins for handtowels, which should be regularly removed and disposed of. Keeping a sufficient supply of additional soap, hand sanitiser and paper towels Personal Protective Equipment Onsite Guidelines When Personal Protective Equipment is provided for employees, the following measures need to be implemented – Gloves should be considered a minimum precaution Where RPE (Respiratory Protective Equipment) is prescribed the user should have this face fit tested Re-usable PPE requires a thorough clean after use and must not be shared with other workers Single-use PPE should be disposed of to ensure it is not reused Got any Questions? Get in Touch If you have any questions about our scaffolding services, please contact Network Scaffold...

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The Impact of Coronavirus on the Scaffolding Industry

The Impact of Coronavirus on the Scaffolding Industry

By on Mar 13, 2020 in Blog |

As the Coronavirus continues to spread all over the world, we need to look at how it could potentially impact the scaffolding sector. There have been thousands of cases reported worldwide, with 596 cases confirmed in the UK at the time of writing this post. Although drastic measures such as closing schools, cancelling events, banning large public gatherings and working from home have been mentioned – this simply isn’t possible within the scaffolding and wider construction industry. Reports have suggested that up to 80% of workers could be unable to work during the forthcoming weeks of the outbreak. Evidence has shown the COVID-19 virus is already present in the industry after EDF reported that one of its workers on Hinckley Point C where two nuclear reactors are being built, has contracted Coronavirus. The latest advice from the UK Government is that workers with symptoms of COVOD-19 are advised to self-isolate for two weeks. The Impact on the Supply Chain Supply chains could be impacted with some scaffolding materials like tube and fittings imported by some providers, from the virus’ country of origin – China. For Network Scaffold, and its employees it is very much business as usual unless we communicate otherwise. Advice on Avoiding Coronavirus The NHS has suggested the following measures to avoid catching and spreading coronavirus – • Wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds. • Always wash your hands when you get home or into work. • Use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze. • Put used tissues in the bin straight away and wash your hands afterwards. • Try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell. • Do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean. Contact Us for More Information If you have any questions about our scaffolding services, please get in touch today. Network Scaffold offer scaffolding, access scaffolding, edge protection and alloy towers for projects right across Derbyshire and the surrounding...

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