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Posts Tagged "Scaffolding"

Roofing Repairs using Scaffolding

Roofing Repairs using Scaffolding

By on Mar 3, 2020 in Blog |

Replacing tiles, repairing cracks and structural jobs are all complex tasks for carrying out roof repairs. Network Scaffold would always recommend you work with a qualified roofing professional, as they all have several risks for both access and safety that you need to be aware of. The important question is – do you need scaffold or a ladder for roof repairs? Scaffolding will cost you more, but can put a price on safety? What you get with scaffolding from Network Scaffold, is high-quality scaffold from accredited professionals who are members of the Scaffolding Association. Below we are going to provide the necessary guidelines for your next project to help to make an informed decision. What Size is the Project? For smaller projects, such as a minor gutter repair or fallen roof tile towards the edge of the roof that only needs one of two people – you will be okay using a ladder. However, for larger repairs such as laying new roof tiles across your whole roof requires a proper risk assessment report – meaning you need scaffolding. Jobs that require work on your entire roof are also going to need scaffold, as it gives those carrying out repairs a safe and sturdy platform to stand on and carry out the work more efficiently than going up and down a ladder every few seconds. For workers on the ground, scaffolding is also safer, as if the scaffold is fitted with edge protection it will alleviate the risk of materials falling and causing injuries. Chutes can also be installed to allow the safe transportation of materials. How Long Could Your Project Take? If your project takes longer than a day, using scaffold is always the best option, as it is more efficient plus the fact the elements can take their toll over a number of days. Scaffolding is much more robust in harsher conditions compared to a ladder. With the recent Storm David, Storm Ciara and Storm Jorge reinforcing this point. Want to Know More about Scaffolding? Contact Us Today If you want to know more about scaffolding for commercial and domestic projects, please get in touch with Network Scaffold...

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Understanding the Legal Requirements of Scaffolding

Understanding the Legal Requirements of Scaffolding

By on Feb 20, 2020 in Blog |

Here at Network Scaffold, we understand the importance of providing the safest scaffolding for both commercial and domestic projects. For our latest blog, we are going to explain the legal requirements, competence and supervision guidelines for scaffolding. All scaffolds must be erected, altered and dismantled in a safe manner, which is achieved by referring to guidelines provided by the National Access & Scaffolding Confederation (NASC) in a document called SG4: Preventing Falls in Scaffolding. Contractors need to follow similar guidance provided by the manufacturers of their scaffolding system (such as Network Scaffold) or by consulting Access Design & Safety literature on Design Safe. Contractors need to be aware that any proposed alterations or modifications which takes scaffold outside of a generally recognised TG20 configuration must be designed, checked and proven via calculations by a competent person. What Should Scaffold Design Include? Work at Height Regulations 2005 state that unless scaffolding is assembled to a recognised configuration and must be designed by a competent person with bespoke calculation. This ensures the scaffold will have required rigidity, strength and stability during the erection, use and dismantling. Competence and Supervision Guidelines for Scaffold Employees must be competent for scaffolding work they undertake and receive sufficient training which is relevant to the complexity of the scaffolding they are working with. At the minimum, each member of your scaffolding team needs to contain a competent person who has the appropriate level of training needed for the scaffold they are working with, that covers how to erect, alter and dismantle the scaffold. Trainee and apprentice scaffolders should always be directly supervised by a competent person. Any operative who has yet to complete approved training methods and assessment should be considered trainees. Want to Know More? Get in Touch If you have any more questions about our services, please contact us today. Network Scaffold is the leading suppliers of scaffold and access scaffolding across the East Midlands – including Derby and...

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Using Temporary Roofing with Scaffolding

Using Temporary Roofing with Scaffolding

By on Jan 20, 2020 in Blog |

Temporary roof scaffolding and covering help to guard your building’s structure when you need to repair tiles or have a leak in your roof. Here in the U.K, we have plenty of rainy days, so if you are waiting for a new roof to be installed on your property you simply can’t expose it to the elements. For our latest blog, our team of specialists are going to explore temporary roofing in more detail and explain how it works with scaffolding. How Temporary Roofs Work Most temporary roofs are put together in sections on the ground and then lifted into place by a crane, which reduces the amount of working at height plus it is quicker and more cost-effective. Encapsulating the sides gives your roofing a watertight finish meaning that work can continue throughout the year without the fear of any stoppages due to adverse weather. One of the most common temporary roofs specified is the UBIX system, which allows safe installation by feeding the sheeting through runners from the scaffold on either side of the structure. Here is a breakdown of the basics of the UBIX system –  The light and the aesthetic weather-resistant roof is quick to assemble It can be built as a mono or duo pitch roof The roof opens to allow materials to be craned through Temporary roofs can be used as a mobile roof structure They usually span up to 15m, but greater spans are available from different suppliers Network Scaffold – The Construction Specialists Network Scaffold has been the leading the providers of scaffolding and access scaffolding for projects right across Staffordshire, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Loughborough for a number of years. Our hands-on approach with our clients makes us the first choice for domestic and commercial construction projects. With the recent Storm Brendan ravaging all parts of the country, you may require scaffolding to help with repairs on your property. Contact Us Today for More Information If you have any questions about our scaffold services, please contact us...

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Preparing for Storm Brendan with Network Scaffold

Preparing for Storm Brendan with Network Scaffold

By on Jan 10, 2020 in Blog |

The country is preparing for a barrage of unpredictable weather as Storm Brendan descends on us; but what should you do with your scaffolding? The Met Office has warned of winds up to 80mph, with a weather warning issued across Monday 13th and Tuesday 14th January. Simon Partridge, Forecaster at The Met Office commented, “As it pushes through, pretty much every part of the UK will feel the influence.” Network Scaffold puts the health and safety of our clients at the forefront of our work; which is why we are sharing some handy safety tips in our latest post. Essential Scaffolding Tips to Follow Here are 8 tips for construction workers when working with scaffolding – Construction workers should never climb on scaffolds that wobble or leans to one side Before mounting the scaffold, it needs to be inspected very carefully and should not be used if a pulley, hook, block or fitting is worn out, rusted, cracked or damaged in a different manner If the scaffold has been tagged as out of service, you should stay away from it The scaffold should not be supported using objects such as bricks, blocks, barrels or boxes Guardrails or flooring need to be in the right place before being used Scaffolding should be levelled after every corner, with the adjusting leg screws shouldn’t be extended beyond 12 inches Workers on scaffolds raised above 10 feet from the ground should be worn with safety belts Your team should keep both the feet on the deck and should not sit or climb on the guardrails Want to Find Out More? Contact Us Today If you have any questions about working around weather conditions such as Storm Brendan, please get in touch today or alternatively, read our FAQ section. Network Scaffold is the leading scaffolding providers for Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Loughborough and...

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Understanding Basic Components for Scaffolding

Understanding Basic Components for Scaffolding

By on Nov 14, 2019 in Blog |

If you’ve never used scaffolding for a construction project before, you may not know all the components that are required. Network Scaffold are seasoned experts in erecting and dismantling scaffolding on projects right across Derbyshire, Tamworth and the surrounding areas. Every Component of Scaffolding Explained Here we are going to explain all of the components required to make your scaffolding safe and secure – Putlogs and Transoms – Putlogs and transoms should be horizontal and securely fixed to ledgers or standards with right-angled or putlog couplers. They will need to be supported with the flattened end placed right into the mortar bed joint of brickwork with putlogs approximately 75mm long. Ledgers – Ledgers should be horizontal and securely fixed to inside of standards with right-angled load-bearing couplers. They also need to be fitted in such a way that joints are staggered between bays. Ledger Bracing – Ledgers need to be fitted on alternative pairs of standards except where the width of the bays are 1.5mm or less, which means they should be fitted on every third pair. They should be fitted with ledgers or standards using load-bearing fittings, to the full height of the scaffold and start at the base level. Standards – Standards should be fitted vertically or inclined slightly towards the structure and spaced in such a way as to give sufficient support. They should also be on a base plate, or on a base plate and sole board to prevent displacement and near to ledgers. Finally, standards need to be fitted so any joints are staggered between bays. Longitudinal or Facade Bracing – These should be fitted to all scaffolds that do not get the longitudinal stability by any other means. Bracing needs to be connected to every lift of extended transoms with right-angled couplers or to every standard with swivel couplers. All joints should be manufactured with sleeve couplers. Ties – Ties link the scaffold to the structure and help to resist inward and outward movement plus they give additional longitudinal stability. Scaffold Boards – The minimum a scaffold board can overhang a putlog or transom is 50mm, with the maximum overhang dependant on the thickness of the board. Decking – Decking and working platforms...

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